How an SEO workshop lead to a complete restructure of content on Weld.io

Earlier this week, we had an SEO workshop with Pineberry (they’re partners with SSE Business Lab where we sit).

We got lots of actionable advice, but also left with a deeper understanding of how searching works and what Google’s mission is. My analysis is that Google wants all the world’s information structured in one big hierarchy. Every piece of information should have it’s own unique key (URL) and only be in one place only (no duplicates). Like one big library with only one of each book, with its own shelf.

“Google wants all the world’s information structured in one big hierarchy. Every piece of information should have it’s own unique key (URL) and only be in one place only (no duplicates).”

As this seeped in, I started thinking of content in a wider sense. Sure, we have our blog and our “docs” knowledge base, content similar to most companies. But we also have content that is very specific to our business, such as objects (widgets) and templates, videos and user stories.

So, this is what we did:

  • We started mapping out all our content in a spreadsheet.
  • We analyzed the hierarchy and how we wanted it to be found. Eventually we settled on short URLs and a “shallow” hierarchy with just /category/article. Instead of just previous categories “blog” and “docs”, we added “videos”, “objects”, “templates”, and “userstories”.
  • We took all the content from our Tumblr blog and our Docs site hosted on KnowledgeOwl, and moved it to WordPress as database.
  • For videos, we decided to keep our Vimeo channel as the main CMS – for less redundancy.
  • We built a custom frontend in AngularJS, completely integrating the content with our regular web application.
  • We built a small web app that would take incoming requests to our blog and docs sites, and send them along (with 301 redirects) to their new full URLs on the new site.

Check out the new Weld “Learn” site at www.weld.io/learn

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